Interview Microphones 

Let’s break up the categories of microphones into the most popular folkloric  functions: (1) One on One or Oral History style Interviews; (2) Concert/Lecture/Performance; (3) Ambient and Environmental. You would think a sit down interview would be simple and have limited noise.  Be careful, your ceiling fan or a/c vent could ruin your recording.  It’s important to get your microphone as close to the subjects mouth as possible.

Lavalier (lapel) Microphone: these are the small microphones worn by talking heads on Television. To do very good quality recordings of inexperienced speakers while seated, consider using a lag mic.  A lav mic is best for seated interviews for 2 reasons. First the subject does not need to know how to “stay on mic” they can turn their heads, move around and generally be comfortable. Second, as the subject does not see the mic, they quickly forget they are being recorded. The interview then becomes a one on one conversation with another person, something we are all comfortable with and for this reason you get better content. An added plus is as the mic is close to the speaker unwanted background noises are not as audible. Low cost lav mics are not only noisy but more susceptible to the sound of clothes moving so buy a professional qualify lav mic!

 

RodeLink Wireless Filmmaker Kit ($399)

This is a very recent wireless lavalier system. I tried it, but did not have much luck with it. It uses a digital signal between the receiver and transmitter.  This is very different than the Sennheiser that uses UHF frequencies.  However, many folks like this system and have not had any trouble.

Sennheiser EW 112p G3 ($629)

This is the lavalier system that I use.  It is very reliable and works great.

Countryman B3 Lavalier Microphone ($179.95)

This a nice wired lavalier microphone that I highly recommend.  Keep in mind that you will need phantom power to push it through.

Concert/Lecture/Performance w/ Amplified Sound

RodeLink Wireless Filmmaker Kit ($399)

This is a very recent wireless lavalier system. I tried it, but did not have much luck with it. It uses a digital signal between the receiver and transmitter.  This is very different than the Sennheiser that uses UHF frequencies.  However, many folks like this system and have not had any trouble.

Sennheiser EW 112p G3 ($629)

This is the lavalier system that I use.  It is very reliable and works great.

Countryman B3 Lavalier Microphone ($179.95)

This a nice wired lavalier microphone that I highly recommend.  Keep in mind that you will need phantom power to push it through.